Jan
27
2009
--

Computer memories: Doug Belshaw

The full version of this ‘ICT history’ can be found on Doug’s blog.

BBC Micro

My Dad was Deputy Head of the high school (13-18) I eventually attended. I can remember him bringing back a BBC Micro that must have cost the school a fair chunk of cash. Given that the BBC Micro was discontinued in 1986, it couldn’t have been long after that he started bringing it home in the school holidays. I can distinctly remember having to type in lines and lines of code to play a game called Duck Hunt. There was no way for me to save it once I’d programmed it in, so there was more typing than playing going on! I don’t think it was exactly the same as this version for the Nintendo NES, but it was similar…

My Dad also brought an Acorn Computer back once, but as we had no games for it, we (my younger sister and I), didn’t really use it.

Nintendo NES

I was never allowed to have a games console, my parents being of the belief (quite rightly) that I’d just spend my life playing video games. One of my friends who I only saw outside of school time had a Nintendo Entertainment System, which was legendary – Super Mario and the like made me a frequent visitor to his house!

Amiga 600

As my birthday is very close to Christmas, I was in the fortunate situation of being able to combine the money that would be spent on present for me to get one ‘big’ present. Given that the Amiga 600, according to Wikipedia, went into production in 1992 and was discontinued in 1993, I must have received it for birthday/Christmas 1992. As a 12-year-old, I can remember going to Canterbury when we were on a family holiday and my parents buying Lemmings and Kick Off 2 for me. Although, theoretically, the Amiga 600 was a computer and a games console, I never did anything other than play games on it! ;-)

Sega Megadrive

Sonic the Hedgehog
Image via Wikipedia

Whilst I had my Amiga 600, another friend had a Sega Megadrive. This was my first experience of Sonic the Hedgehog and I found the graphics on it amazing – especially when the 32X add-on was released!

Compaq Presario Pentium 75

My Dad had brought home his 486DX-powered PC during the holidays during 1994 and 1995. It was upon this that I learned how to touch-type with a version of Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing that came free on the front of a magazine. Then – and I’m not sure how I managed to do this – I persuaded my parents to spend £1,500 in Bainbridges (now John Lewis) on a Pentium 75-powered PC. I think I promised that it would not only be a combined birthday and Christmas present for 1995, but for 1996 and 1997 as well!

I can remember playing Sim City 2000 and especially, the Secret of Monkey Island on this machine. My sister and I would return from school and be straight on the PC trying to figure out the next puzzle! I also had Sensible Soccer, a flight simulator, and some other games.

It was with this machine, however, and Windows 95 that I began to use the PC as a computer rather than a console. Before Freeserve, you had a choice between paying Compuserve or AOL around £15 per month on top of dial-up charges to access the Internet. My PC had a 28.8kbps modem – twice the speed of the previous 14.4kbps standard.

There was no way that my parents were going to pay this to allow me access to a resource they didn’t see as necessary to my education. I tried and tried and tried to persuade them, but when they didn’t agree I decided to take matters into my own hands. I used my Dad’s credit card to sign up for a 30-day Compuserve trial, and then used the Internet when my parents were not using the phone. This, of course, was slightly dangerous as, if they’d picked up the phone when I was online, they would have been able to hear the giveaway noises. I had to go to a phone box and pretend to be my Dad after about 29 days to cancel my (his!) Compuserve account, and make sure I wasn’t connected for longer than an hour. Billing was only itemised for calls over 60 pence, you see…

In 1997, as a 16-year-old, I was getting a bit fed-up of Windows 95. I’d read about Open Source Software and Linux in particular. Although by now I had a 56kbps modem and my parents allowed me online via Freeserve, downloading anything substantial over this connection speed was painful. I bought a book with a title something like Teach yourself Red Hat Linux in 24 hours. Despite the book that came with it, I couldn’t get Linux to work properly on my PC.

[Continues further on Doug’s blog]

Doug Belshaw
www.dougbelshaw.com

Jan
22
2009
--

Computer memories: Andrew Field

zx_spectrum

The first computer I can remember using was a Sinclair ZX Spectrum 48kb in around 1982 / 83. My sister was given one for Christmas – it came with a few games and some programming manuals. It seemed amazing clever at the time.

At school at the time there was one computer lab with BBC Micros. I remember being shown the lab, but being too young to be allowed in it properly 🙁

Later on I was taught how to make a graphic move across the screen on a BBC. I still remember the lesson. There was a real sense of achievement in getting a white character to move across the screen.

I subsequently inherited my sister’s computer and was bought a printer for it. It wasn’t very powerful at all, but seemed really impressive when I was little. I remember creating a quiz program to help my sister revise her A-Level history.

za_spectrum128_2a

A few years later moved to a Spectrum 128k +2, a more powerful version of the Spectrum. My Mum and Dad also purchased a PCW 9512 – a dedicated wordprocessor. I used that to write a program that did my GCSE Maths coursework on quadratic equations for me.

amiga_500
However, my favourite computer when I was younger was the Amiga 500. This offered some great features – an impressive mixture of graphics, office-type tools, programming and games. I even wrote a few games using a program called ‘AMOS Professional’. I tried to buy an Amiga 1200 but we weren’t able to as this was the time Commodore went bust.

amos_pro

Since then I drifted into PCs having used them in the later years of secondary school and in earnest at University. One of my courses at university was even called “Computing for Historians” – it was much more interesting than the title and associated book suggest.

What’s your computer history?

Written by in: Memories | Tags: , , , , ,
Jan
20
2009
--

Resource: Overview of older computers

This is Mikila’s overview covering the BBC Micro, ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64, Acorn Archimedes, Amiga 500 and the Atari ST.

Provides brief technical information together with additional dates and details.  A good start before producing more detailed leaflets 🙂

pdf_icon
 Overview of older computers.pdf

Jan
20
2009
--

Links: The Amiga

You can find out about the history of the Amiga from a number of different sites.

255px-amiga500_system

These include:

Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Amiga
Personal history – http://www.heartbone.com/comphist/AmigaHistory.htm
AmigaHistory.co.uk – http://www.amigahistory.co.uk/ahistory.html
Ars Technica – http://arstechnica.com/articles/culture/a-history-of-the-amiga-part-1.ars

Written by in: Links & Resources | Tags: , ,

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com